Monday, April 23, 2018

5/20 Twitter Chat: Making Activism Accessible

Image description: white graphic with black text that reads "#CripTheVote Twitter Chat: Making Activism Accessible, May 20, 2018, 4 pm Pacific/ 7 pm Eastern, Guest host: @autselfadvocacy, For more: http://cripthevote.blogspot.com/. On the left is the icon for Twitter, a bird in black and on the right is a graphic in black of a website with text.

How can activism become more accessible? How are people with cognitive disabilities left out of activism and political participation? Join the co-partners of #CripTheVote in a discussion about these issues with the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN)

From ASAN: People with cognitive disabilities think and learn differently. Down syndrome and autism are examples of cognitive disabilities. We might need more support to learn something new. Using simple, common words to explain things helps us understand.

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network is a nonprofit by and for autistic people that works to educate communities, support self-advocacy in all its forms, and improve public perceptions of autism.

Welcome to the #CripTheVote chat on making activism accessible! We are delighted to have guest host @autselfadvocacy join us. Please note: accessibility is a broad topic and today’s chat will focus on accessibility for people w/ cognitive disabilities.


How to Participate

Follow @GreggBeratan @AndrewPulrang @DisVisibility @autselfadvocacy. When it’s time, search #CripTheVote on Twitter for the series of live tweets under the ‘Latest’ tab for the full conversation. 

If you don’t use Twitter, you can follow along in real time here: http://twubs.com/CripTheVote If you might be overwhelmed by the amount of tweets and only want to see the chat’s questions so you can respond to them, check @DisVisibility’s account.

Check out this explanation of how to participate in a Twitter chat by Ruti Regan:

Check out this captioned ASL explanation of how to participate in a chat by @behearddc

Introductory Tweets and Questions for the Chat

Remember to use the #CripTheVote hashtag when you tweet. If you respond to a question such as Q1, your tweet should follow this format: “A1 [your message] #CripTheVote”

Q1 What does ‘accessible activism’ mean to you? What are some basic features of accessible activism that any activist, campaign, or organization should follow? #CripTheVote

Q2 Have you run into barriers to activism, including activism outside of the disability community? If so, please describe how they impacted you and how you responded  #CripTheVote

Q3 Are some forms of direct action or in person activism inaccessible? Is that ok, given that people have different limits and abilities? Why or why not? #CripTheVote

Q4 On organizing events: What are the most important things people should know about making their events (meeting, rally, conference) accessible for people w/ cognitive disabilities? What are some dos and don’ts?  #CripTheVote

Q5 On information and language: How can materials (printed, online, video, audio, social media) become more accessible for people w/ cognitive disabilities? What are some great examples you’ve seen? Resources?

Q6 Related to language: Why is it important for materials to be written in plain language? What are some other tips for making information as simple & easy to read as possible?  #CripTheVote

Q7 We are big believers in ‘nothing about us, without us.’ What is your advice for how all organizations, including disability organizations, can include people with cognitive disabilities in their activities/campaigns? How can organizers avoid making people with cognitive disabilities into tokens? #CripTheVote

Definition: Tokens are people who get used by groups of people as a figure to show that the group is inclusive. Groups that use people as tokens do not listen to those people, or their community members. “Tokenizing” is making a person into a token. #CripTheVote

Q8 For people with disabilities who have other marginalized identities: how do we make sure everyone gets a ‘seat at the table’ when it comes to community organizing and activism?

Definition: Marginalized identities are groups that have less power in society. For example, people with disabilities, people of color, women, transgender people, or gay people. People can have more than one marginalized identity. #CripTheVote

Thank you for joining the #CripTheVote chat on making activism accessible for people w/ cognitive disabilities! A big thank you to our guest host @autselfadvocacy. Check out our blog for the latest: http://cripthevote.blogspot.com/

Friday, April 13, 2018

ORGANIZERS FORUM: Disability and Running for Office

Note: We are boosting the following announcement from the National Disability Leadership Alliance, which may be of interest to people with disabilities who want to take the next big step in their quests to #CripTheVote ... by running for office.

===============

From: Jessica Lehman
Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 12:32 AM

Subject: Organizers Forum April 17: Disability and Running for Office

ORGANIZERS FORUM: Disability and Running for Office

TUESDAY, APRIL 17
, 20181-2 pm Eastern time, 12-1 Central time, 11-12 Mountain time, 10-11 am Pacific time

Call-in: 1-515-739-1285 
Passcode: 521847#
To join through your computer, go to:

Although one in six voters has a disability
, we are underrepresented and under-recognized as political candidates and public servants. This call will talk about the importance of running for and serving in public office as a person with a disability, the challenges and opportunities that people with disabilities (especially those who are multiply marginalized) face in campaigns, and the work being done to increase resources to train disabled leaders to run for office. 

Speakers: 
Congressman James Langevin (tentative) represents Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District.  
Thida Cornes was the first openly disabled candidate to run for Mountain View, California City Council and serves on the Mountain View Environmental Sustainability Task Force.  
Reyma McDeid is currently running for Iowa House District 38 and is the Executive Director of Central Iowa Center for Independent Living.  
Sarah Blahovec is the Disability Vote Organizer for the National Council on Independent Living.  

Please forward to your lists ASAP. (Be sure to include computer link and passcode to CART below.)

To give us an idea of who joins our calls, if you are interested in joining on Tuesday, please fill out this quick form! https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?fromEmail=true&formkey=dHAxWEV5Y3h3MUtrcW1LYXhTcjZyYUE6MQ 

CART: The call will have real-time captioning (CART)! The website where you will be able to view the captioning is https://2020archive.1capapp.com/event/forum/. Thank you to the National Disability Leadership Alliance for sponsoring the captioning of this call.

If you need additional accommodations to participate in the call, please let us know as soon as possible.


MARK YOUR CALENDARS! The Organizer's Forum has a call on the 3rd Tuesday of each month, 1-2 pm EST (10-11 am PST).

NOTE: We have a listserv for discussion on these issues. It's organizersforum@yahoogroups.com; please go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/organizersforum/ and click "Join this group!" We also have our separate announcement-only listserv to allow everyone to easily get notices about the Organizer's Forum, calleddisabilityorganizing@googlegroups.com. Please email us to be added.We also have a Facebook page! We can use this is a way to continue our conversation beyond the monthly calls. Please "like" Organizer's Forum on Facebook. http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?cropsuccess&id=680444432#!/pages/Organizers-Forum/228971863811531?sk=info


Background:

The Organizing Workgroup of the National Disability Leadership Alliance hosts these calls the third Tuesday of every month as a resource for disability organizers, in an effort toward building the organizing capacity of the disability community across the country. They generally follow the format of a Welcome followed by 2-3 experts in a given area speaking for a few minutes on their experiences, advice and challenges. The calls include a 20-30 minute question and answer period.

To ask questions via CART: Sign-in to the Chat function on the right side of the transcript and type your question.  One of the call facilitators will read out any questions posted there.

Because we want to maximize the generously donated CART services, we will begin the call promptly at 1pm and end the call promptly at 2pm (eastern time).

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

4/8/18 #CripTheVote Twitter Chat: Results from 2018 #CripTheVote Disability Issues Survey

#CripTheVote Twitter Chat: Looking Forward - Results from 2018 #CripTheVote Disability Issues Survey - Sunday, April 8, 2018, 7 PM Eastern / 4 PM Pacific

In the first few months of #CripTheVote, back during the 2016 primaries, we posted a disability issues survey, hoping to get an idea of what kinds of issues and policy ideas disabled voters were thinking about. The results helped guide #CripTheVote discussions, and also provided some concrete ideas to share with candidates, to help engage them more with disability concerns.

Two years later, we decided to run the same survey again, with the same purpose, but also to see how opinions and priorities might have changed. We ran the same questions and options, but also added a place where people could suggest new issues not included in the original survey, that might have emerged since 2016.

This year, we hoped to get at least 500 responses, which is about what we got in 2016. In the end, 589 people responded! And you can see the results … in graphical charts and text data here:

2018 #CripTheVote Disability Issues Survey Results

In this chat, we will discuss these results, what they might mean, and how we can use them during this Midterm Election year.

How to Participate in the Chat

Follow @GreggBeratan @AndrewPulrang and @DisVisibility. When it’s time, search #CripTheVote on Twitter for the series of live tweets under the ‘Latest’ tab for the full conversation. 

If you don’t use Twitter, you can follow along in real time here: http://twubs.com/CripTheVote
If you feel overwhelmed by the volume of tweets and only want to see the chat’s questions so you can respond to them, check @AndrewPulrang’s account.

Check out this explanation of how to participate in a Twitter chat by Ruti Regan: https://storify.com/RutiRegan/examplechat

Check out this captioned ASL explanation of how to participate in a chat by @behearddc
https://www.facebook.com/HEARDDC/videos/1181213075257528/

Introductory Tweets:

Welcome to a Twitter chat on the 2018 #CripTheVote Disability Issues Survey. Please remember to use the #CripTheVote hashtag when you tweet. If you respond to a question such as Q1, your tweet should follow this format: “A1 [your message] #CripTheVote”

Our discussion will reference results from the 2018 and 2016 #CripTheVote Disability Issues Surveys, which you can review here: http://cripthevote.blogspot.com/p/2016-survey.html

Before we start, a note about methodology. We decided to use SurveyMonkey again because of its rich graphical reporting, and to be consistent with the 2016 survey. We also offered a text-only version. #CripTheVote

11 responses were submitted that way and are fully incorporated into the final results. Obviously, this is not a scientific survey or definitive measurement of what the disability community in America thinks on all topics. The purpose is to spark conversation. #CripTheVote

Questions:

Q1: How well do the 2018 survey results match up with your own issue preferences and priorities? #CripTheVote

Q2: Which results of the 2018 Survey surprised you? Which results are good to see and which do you disagree with? #CripTheVote

Q3: Defending Social Security stands out as the top rated policy by far at 72%, with the next highest policy, hiring more disabled people in govt at 56.32%. In 2016, Social Security ranked lower, while all of the scores were closer together. Any thoughts on this? #CripTheVote

Q4: Accessibility-related issues scored fairly high, the 3rd highest priority issue category, and 5th ranked out of 15 policy proposals. What kinds of actual policies and political strategies can help make practical gains in accessibility? #CripTheVote

Q5: What do you think of the lower-ranked issues, Employment, Education, Long Term Care, Transportation, and Assistive Technology? Why do you think these issues ranked relatively low in both years? #CripTheVote

Q6: Aside from a few notable differences, like the much higher ranking for defending Social Security, there wasn’t much change in results between 2016 and 2018. What do you think that suggests? #CripTheVote

Q7: What are your thoughts about the new ‘write-in’ policy ideas? What’s missing? What do you care about? #CripTheVote

Q8: Which results would be most important to know for candidates running for office? #CripTheVote

Q9: How can we use these survey results most effectively during the Midterm Election campaigns? #CripTheVote

This concludes the #CripTheVote chat about our 2018 Disability Issues Survey. Join us on 5/20, for our chat “Making Activism Accessible” with guest host @autselfadvocacy!  https://www.facebook.com/events/178897666172260/

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Frequently Asked Questions


What is the purpose of #CripTheVote?

#CripTheVote is a nonpartisan campaign to engage both voters and politicians in a productive discussion about disability issues in the United States, with the hope that Disability takes on greater prominence within the American political landscape. We hope to encourage people with disabilities to engage with elections at all levels from President on down, and to vote. We also want candidates to engage with disability policy issues and disabled people as much as possible.

What is "CripTheVote" supposed to mean?

Basically, it is a catchy way of referring to the idea of disabled people being active voters and through their collective power, forcing important disability issues into the mainstream.

Why do you use the word "Crip"? Isn't that offensive?

We realize the word "Crip" isn't for everyone, but we chose it for several reasons. Read more about that here.

What can I do if I don’t use Twitter?

You don't need a Twitter account if you want to follow the conversation happening in real-time. At any time, you can check this link. This link will show all the tweets that use the CripTheVote hashtag and you can scroll up and down to read all the comments.

Don’t laugh, but what, exactly, is a “Twitter Chat?” And while we’re at it, what’s a “hashtag?”

A Twitter Chat is a public discussion that uses a hashtag as a virtual meeting point on Twitter. A hashtag is a way of making tweets more easily searchable. By using the hashtag (in this case #CripTheVote) one can find all of the tweets on a particular subject in one place by either clicking on the hashtag or using twitter’s search function. For an example of what a Twitter chat looks like, check out this example by Ruti Regan. It’s very helpful explaining the elements of a typical Twitter chat.

What if I can't keep up with the questions during a Twitter chat?

It's fine to tweet at your own pace. We post our questions in advance in case folks want to prepare. Also, we don't expect folks to have to keep up. Our questions are spaced 4-5 minutes in advance but people can reply at their own leisure. There's no wrong way to participate in a chat. You're welcome to tweet before, during and after the scheduled time. We also suggest you read this guide to using Twitter for discussions and advocacy.

What does posting Twitter comments with the #CripTheVote hashtag accomplish?

The way Twitter hashtags work, individual participation collects all of our comments and ideas into a noticeable voice with a chance of being noticed outside the already engaged disability activist community. It’s also a convenient way to get us all talking and sharing ideas amongst ourselves. In a more concrete way, it could prompt candidates and political reporters engage publicly with specific disability-related questions. If enough people are using a particular hashtag at a given time, Twitter will identify it as trending which garners even more attention from both the media and other Twitter users.

When should I use the #CripTheVote hashtag?

Include it in tweets about elections, voting, and issues at any level, if it is also in some way related to disability. That could mean comments about particular candidate or political party platform positions on disability issues, candidates’ rhetoric and behavior towards disabled people, questions disabled voters want to ask candidates, policy proposals and bills that would affect disabled people, and ideas for encouraging candidates and journalists to engage with disability issues and disabled voters.

May I argue for my favorite candidate under the #CripTheVote hashtag?

Sure! This effort is non-partisan. We aren’t going to endorse candidates or try to make one look better than the others, but that doesn’t mean you have to keep your own preferences secret. Feel free to make your case. Just remember that we want to keep this these discussions respectful and broadly focused on disability-related issues and voting by disabled people. So, if you are going to publicize a candidate, make sure to explain the relevance to disability issues, such as the candidate’s record or positions on disability policy questions.

Why focus on voting by disabled people?

Americans with disabilities could become a very powerful constituency of voters. But currently, we are punching below our weight. While over 16 million people with disabilities voted in the 2016 elections, voter turnout rate of people with disabilities was 6 percentage points lower than that of people without disabilities. Meanwhile, the voter registration rate of people with disabilities was 2 percentage points lower than that of people without disabilities. That is a lot of untapped political power. (Fact sheet: Disability and Voter Turnout in the 2016 Elections Lisa Schur and Douglas Kruse, Rutgers University).

What actually happens, and when?

The signature activity of #CripTheVote is Twitter Chats on topics related both to elections, and to specific disability policy issues.  However, people contribute comments, information, questions, and links to articles on disability issues every day under the #CripTheVote hashtag. Every day there’s something to read, and all are invited to contribute to the ongoing #CripTheVote discussion of disability, politics, policy, identity, and voting.

Who can I talk to if I have any questions?

You may email questions to:

Why We Use "#CripTheVote"?

While #CripTheVote has gotten a lot of disabled people excited about participating in this year’s elections, a few folks have questioned our decision to make “crip” a key component of the hashtag. Since the complaints and concerns have been mostly expressed carefully, thoughtfully, and with respect, we feel it makes sense to explain ourselves a bit further, for those who might be interested.
Here is our thinking:
- Selective use of “crip” or “crippled” by people with disabilities is a conscious act of empowerment through “reclaiming” a former slur as a badge of pride. “Selected use” means we don’t use it all the time, in every situation. We exercise judgment in when and where it’s appropriate to use.
- “Crip” and “cripple” are also used ironically, to convey a bit of edginess, humor, and confidence, from a community that people tend to assume will be sad, bitter, and boring.
- Disabled people who identify with “crip” or “cripple,” generally share a strong sense of disability pride and deep involvement in disability activism and culture. We know what the social model of disability is, we are familiar with “person first” language, and we take pride in our disability identities. Calling ourselves “cripples” isn’t a sign of self-hatred or ignorance of disability history … quite the contrary.  
- “Crip” and “cripple” have been used this way by at least some disability activists for decades. It’s not a particularly new practice. It has, however, grown to be more inclusive, as the disability rights movement itself has gradually become more inclusive, both of people with all kinds of disabilities, and of people who have other important identities.
- “Cripple” as an actual label or insult is not just “politically incorrect,” it is archaic. It is a term from a bygone era, largely out of use even by ableists. That is not true of all negative disability terms. For instance, “handicapped” and “retarded” are both used much more often, and are therefore more risky to play around with than “cripple.” That’s why you won’t find many disability activists and proud disabled people using “handicapped” or “retarded” either as reclaimed terms or ironically.
- We chose to use #CripTheVote because it sounded more interesting, hard-edged, and likely to spark interest than safer, more “accurate” terms. It’s the difference between saying, “Rock The Vote!” and saying “Young People Really Should Register And Vote.”
- All that said, using “Crip” or “Cripple” this way isn’t to everyone’s taste. That’s fine. Some people have painful personal histories with the word. Some people despise irony and don’t like messing around with language. Some people feel it’s just too risky.
-We are not speaking for everyone, especially the disability community. We believe there is room for multiple hashtags and conversations--there’s something for everyone.
- However, context does matter, and if you read through the tweets that have come out of the #CripTheVote hashtag, you will see that is has inspired the very opposite of ignorance, stigma, or medical model paternalism.
- For a deeper look into the issue, read Crip Theory, from Wright State University.

Disability Advocacy and Twitter: Why Use It?

Introduction

#CripTheVote is an online campaign that uses Twitter to have conversations about voting and disability issues. We also have blog posts and a Facebook group where we publish information about our upcoming events and news. 
Social media is term that’s used a lot–you might hear about Facebook, YouTube, Snapchat, Instagram as examples. Broadly speaking, social media are websites or apps that allow users to post information (text, photos, audio) and share it to the public or within a specific network of friends/colleagues. 
This article will give a describe the pros and cons of using a social media platform such as Twitter and how to get started for first-time users.

Pros and Cons

Here are a few pros of using social media if you are a person with a disability and interested in disability issues:
  • Most accounts are free*
  • You can connect and find others with similar interests from all over the world
  • You can learn about things that are happening in real-time 
  • You can learn about things that challenge you and make you think differently about disability issues  
  • You can share your thoughts widely to the public and they can influence and impact other people
  • It can help build relationships, both in-person and online
  • People can report/document what’s happening around them
It’s very trendy and can be fun but social media not everyone’s cup of tea. And that’s ok! Here are a few cons and limitations to social media:
  • Although technically free*, some social media sites have ownership of the content you post, collect data on your usage, and feature advertising that you cannot opt out of
  • Not everyone has access to the Internet, a smartphone, or a computer 
  • Not everyone is comfortable learning how to use social media
  • Not everyone likes talking with people you can’t see face-to-face
  • It can be a huge “time suck,” taking you away from other things important to your life
  • Like “real life,” there is the potential for bullying and harassment on social media which can be a serious problem
  • Accessibility issues continue to create barriers to some users with disabilities
Why does #CripTheVote use Social Media?

With all the cons and drawbacks to using social media, we decided that #CripTheVote will be an online campaign that takes place primarily on Twitter for several reasons:
  • It takes a lot of resources and energy to organize in-person events 
  • We can have conversations with a wide swath of people with disabilities by using the #CripTheVote hashtag and having organized Twitter chats on specific issues
  • It’s relatively easy to use social media and doesn’t require any special training or preparation (just practice!)
  • For three people who don’t do this for a living or with any professional connections to the political world, Twitter is one way to insert ourselves into the broader policy/election discussion without any interference

We understand that our campaign will not reach everyone, but there are many other campaigns that are not online with similar goals. There’s something for everyone and there’s no wrong way to be an advocate.

What is a “Twitter Chat?” And while we’re at it, what’s a “hashtag?”
A Twitter Chat is a public discussion that uses a hashtag as a virtual meeting point on twitter. A hashtag is a way of making tweets more easily searchable. By using the hashtag (in this case #CripTheVote) one can find all of the tweets on a particular subject in one place by either clicking on the hashtag or using twitter’s search function. For an example of what a Twitter chat looks like, check out this example by Ruti Regan. It’s very helpful explaining the elements of a typical Twitter chat:https://storify.com/RutiRegan/examplechat
For more about #CripTheVote and frequently asked questions: http://disabilitythinking.com/faqs
To give you a sense of the kinds of Twitter chats hosted by Gregg Beratan, Andrew Pulrang and Alice Wong (the co-partners of #CripTheVote) check out this recent link that summarizes their recent chat on voter accessibility:
You can find all of our chats here:
Getting Started on Twitter

If you are curious and want to try Twitter for the first time, the first thing you need is an email address. Here are a few links that’ll help you get set up:
This 2012 article also gives useful tips on using Twitter for beginners: http://mashable.com/2012/06/05/twitter-for-beginners/#0tlbAHJfqEq7
You can be as involved or uninvolved on social media. Here are some things you can do with Twitter:
  • Follow different organizations and people and read their tweets
  • Send tweets to specific individuals when you use their Twitter handle (that is, their username/account)
  • Re-tweet (share) any tweets that you like
  • Look at various conversations happening in popular culture or current events such as #BlackLivesMatter or #AbleismExists
  • Tweet links of articles or websites that you like
  • Tweet messages or images you want to share
  • And much more
Checking out #CripTheVote without Twitter

You don’t need a Twitter account if you want to follow the conversation happening in real-time. At any time, you can check this link: http://twubs.com/CripTheVote. This link will show all the tweets that use the CripTheVote hashtag and you can scroll up and down to read all the comments.


Screenshot from TWUBS.com that shows the live feed of #CripTheVote tweets on Twitter happening in real-time
Screenshot from TWUBS.com that shows the live feed of #CripTheVote tweets on Twitter happening in real-time
Logging in to Twitter: App for smartphone or desktop

If you use a smartphone, you’ll need to download the Twitter app. This is what you’ll see from an iPhone when you go to the App Store and search for “Twitter”:



Screenshot of the App Store on an iPhone showing the Twitter app
Screenshot of the App Store on an iPhone showing the Twitter app

If you want to tweet from your computer, you can log in here, at https://twitter.com/


Screenshot of a desktop computer open to the main page for Twitter.com
Screenshot of a desktop computer open to the main page for Twitter.com 

Once you log in with the account that you created, you will see this (example of Alice’s Twitter account on her computer):


Screenshot of the main page of @SFdirewolf's account on Twitter
Screenshot of the main page of @SFdirewolf’s account on Twitter
Read the various tweets people are sharing. 

In the search box at the upper right side of the Twitter website or app, type a hashtag, a name, a keyword of whatever you’re looking for. If you enter #CripTheVote, you’ll see this page:


Screenshot showing the Top Tweets tab for tweets using the #CripTheVote hashtag on Twitter
Screenshot showing the Top Tweets tab for tweets using the #CripTheVote hashtag on Twitter

You can Read ‘Top’ tweets that are most popular and shared. ‘Live’ tweets show the most recent ones, and other tabs that with News, Photos, and Videos.
Tweeting with the #CripTheVote hashtag: Selfie edition

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to tweet a photo or message using the #CripTheVote hashtag. Totally up to you, but it might be a fun first-step in connecting with people with disabilities who are interested in voting and current events.



Visibility of people with disabilities is important. Selfies/photos are a wonderful way to share a brief message and say, “Hey, I’m here and this is what matters to me!” Saying who you are and what you care about is a form of advocacy that can lead to a broader community.



Take a photo!

Photos or short videos can make powerful statements. If you’re at the Voting Summit, feel free to complete the sentence, “I vote because…” and take a photo of you with a sign that will be available at the event (or use any piece of paper).
You can take one during the Yo! Voting Summit or afterward. You can use the Twitter app or their desktop version.  Here is Alice’s photo from her iPhone:


Image of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, "I Vote because...the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end."
Image of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, “I Vote because…the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end.”
Tweet Your Photo with a Message!

This is a step-by-step for iPhone users. It might be different for Android or other phones.
Step 1: Open your Photos on your phone


Screenshot of an iPhone's Photo library with an image of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, "I Vote because...the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end."
Screenshot of an iPhone’s Photo library with an image of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, “I Vote because…the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end.”
Step 2: Select the photo you want to post on Twitter by clicking on it

Screenshot of an iPhone's photo app with one image selected among a row of other photos. Below are options to share the image on various apps, via text, email and other sites.
Screenshot of an iPhone’s photo app with one image selected among a row of other photos. Below are options to share the image on various apps, via text, email and other sites.
Step 3: Below your selected photo, you can see the options you have for sharing your photo. Swipe left or right until you see the Twitter icon and select it.

Screenshot of an iPhone's photo app with one image selected among a row of other photos. Below are options to share the image on various apps, including Twitter.
Screenshot of an iPhone’s photo app with one image selected among a row of other photos. Below are options to share the image on various apps, including Twitter.

Step 4: A small window will open that is connected to your Twitter account (and app). Type your message. Remember, you can only type a message no more than 140 characters (including spaces). Be sure to use the #CripTheVote hashtag


Screenshot of an iPhone that selected a photo to post on Twitter. A small window appears with a keyboard underneath
Screenshot of an iPhone that selected a photo to post on Twitter. A small window appears with a keyboard underneath

Step 5: After you type your message, click ‘Post’ on the upper right-hand corner of the window. Below is an example of Alice’s photo. She typed the same message on her sign so it’s accessible to all users.


Screenshot of a window with text written in a Tweet that says partially, "#Medicaid poverty trap needs to end." Below are a series of hashtags: #crip #CripTheVote #CrippleTeam #CrippingTheMighty
Screenshot of a window with text written in a Tweet that says partially, “#Medicaid poverty trap needs to end.” Below are a series of hashtags: #crip #CripTheVote #CrippleTeam #CrippingTheMighty

When you type your message, sometimes you’ll see different hashtags that match the one you’re about to type. For example, when Alice started typing the hashtag, #CripTheVote appeared in a list. You can select it without typing the whole thing.
Step 6: This is what the tweet looks like that’s ready to post. Click “Post.”


Screenshot of a window with a Tweet that says, "I Vote because...the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end. #CripTheVote" Next to it is a photo attached w/ the image of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper with the same message.
Screenshot of a window with a Tweet that says, “I Vote because…the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end. #CripTheVote” Next to it is a photo attached w/ the image of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper with the same message.

Step 7: After clicking “Post,” open your Twitter app on your phone.


Screenshot of an iPhone with a six rows of various icons indicating apps and other functions of a smartphone.
Screenshot of an iPhone with a six rows of various icons indicating apps and other functions of a smartphone.

Step 8: This is what it looks like from Alice’s Twitter account. Now it is public for all to see. If you click on the tweet, you can see the entire image.


Screenshot of a Twitter app that's open showing a tweet by Alice Wong, @SFdirewolf Screenshot of a window with text written that says "I vote because the #Medicaid poverty trap needs to end #CripTheVote" Including an photo of her holding a sign with the same text.
Screenshot of a Twitter app that’s open showing a tweet by Alice Wong, @SFdirewolf Screenshot of a window with text written that says “I vote because the #Medicaid poverty trap needs to end #CripTheVote” Including an photo of her holding a sign with the same text.

If you’re feeling really ambitious, you can now add descriptions (alternative text) to any images you post using Twitter: https://support.twitter.com/articles/20174660
Instagram

If you’re more into Instagram, you can do the same thing and share on Facebook or Flickr at the same time. The steps are similar–just follow these step-by-step images.
Step 1: Open Instagram


Screenshot of an Instagram app for Alice Wong, @alicatsamurai. Below are small images of her instagram images.
Screenshot of an Instagram app for Alice Wong, @alicatsamurai. Below are small images of her instagram images.

Step 2: Select the middle button in blue at the bottom of the screen. Select an image from your photo library (from your phone).


Screenshot of Instagram with an image open from the phone's Camera Roll showing a photo of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, "I Vote because...the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end."
Screenshot of Instagram with an image open from the phone’s Camera Roll showing a photo of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, “I Vote because…the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end.”
Step 3: Type your caption. Instagram is great because you can write longer messages. Don’t forget the hashtag!!

Screenshot of Instagram with a message window open and a small keyboard below. There's a photo of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper. The caption for the Instagram post: "I Vote because...the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end. #CripTheVote"
Screenshot of Instagram with a message window open and a small keyboard below. There’s a photo of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper. The caption for the Instagram post: “I Vote because…the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end. #CripTheVote”

You can tag your friends on Instagram or post the same image and caption to other social media sites connected that you might use such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr. 
Note: I don’t select Twitter when I use Instagram because the image doesn’t appear on Twitter, just a link back to Instagram.
Step 4: When you’re done, click “Share.”


Instagram window that says, Share To. Below is the image, the caption, and several options of tagging people, adding location, and posting directly to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or Flicker. Below is a Share button.
Instagram window that says, Share To. Below is the image, the caption, and several options of tagging people, adding location, and posting directly to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or Flicker. Below is a Share button.
Ta-da!

Here’s the same message I tweeted on Twitter, but this time on Instagram using the same hashtag. No matter what social media site you use, people can find similar posts on under this keyword.


Screenshot of a recent Instagram post by user alicatsamurai showing a photo of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, "I Vote because...the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end." The caption below the message has the same text in the sign.
Screenshot of a recent Instagram post by user alicatsamurai showing a photo of an Asian American woman in a wheelchair holding a white piece of paper that says, “I Vote because…the Medicaid poverty trap needs to end.” The caption below the message has the same text in the sign.

Conclusion

Have fun with social media if you already use it or are interested in trying it! There’s no wrong way to do it and you’ll get the hang of it eventually. If you’re shy, you can post message without a photo. 
It’s up to you how much you want to reveal. You are in control.
Don’t Be a Stranger!

We’d love to hear from you! Feel free to email us: DisabilityVisibilityProject@gmail.com
Or if you’re on Twitter, you can follow Andrew, Gregg, and Alice: